Two Canadian Cameras Installed at ISS Removed After Technical Glitch1 min read

Two Earth-observing cameras that were installed last week at the International Space Station have been removed because of the technical glitch and for safety reasons. These cameras have been manufactured by Canada’s UrtheCast Corp. and were installed on the Zvezda service module, the Russian fragment of the space station.

On Monday, UrtheCast Corp. revealed that at present, the cameras have now been kept inside the ISS. The cameras were installed by Russian astronauts Oleg Kotov and Sergei Ryazansky without any unpleasant incident on December 27 spacewalk. Soon after the installation of these cameras, the Mission Control Centre near Moscow reported that they were not able to receive any information from either camera.

Vancouver-based UrtheCast stated that devoid of any data, the control centre could not verify that the cameras were getting power or not. Also, they were not able to make out if the cameras were capable of enduring ‘temperature fluctuations’ in space.

It was predicted that the cameras will start broadcasting high-definition pictures of the Earth via Internet early next year. One of the cameras captures photos and the other streams video. They would also be used for observing agriculture, forestry and the environment in general.

The video camera can capture pictures of an area measuring three by five kilometers. UrtheCast revealed that it will declare a new date to install the cameras again by mid-January or earlier.

UrtheCast was founded in 2011 and was trading up by about 8.5% or 15 cents, at $2.05 on Monday on the Toronto Stock Exchange.

 

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Sebastien Clarke
Sebastien Clarke

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