Spacecraft wakes, calls home2 min read

Waking up after almost three years of hibernation, a comet-chasing spacecraft sent its first signal back to Earth on Monday, prompting cheers from scientists who hope to use it to land the first space lander onto a comet.

The European Space Agency received the all-clear message from its Rosetta spacecraft at 1:18 p.m. EST – a message that had to travel some 800 million kilometres.

In keeping with the agency’s effort to turn the tense wait for a signal into a social media event, the probe triggered a series of “Hello World!” tweets in different languages.

Technicians celebrate after receiving the Rosetta spacecraft's wake up signal on Monday in the European Space Agency's control room in Darmstadt, Germany. Photograph by: The Associated Press , The Associated Press

Technicians celebrate after receiving the Rosetta spacecraft’s wake up signal on Monday in the European Space Agency’s control room in Darmstadt, Germany.
Photograph by: The Associated Press , The Associated Press

Dormant sys tems on the unmanned spacecraft were switched back on in preparation for the final stage of its decadelong mission to rendezvous with the comet named 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Systems had been powered down in 2011 to conserve energy, leaving scientists in the dark about the probe’s fate until now.

“I think it’s been the longest hour of my life,” said Andrea Accomazzo, the spacecraft’s operations manager at ESA’s mission control room in Darmstadt, Germany.

“Now we have it back.” Scientists will now take control of Rosetta again, a procedure slowed by the 45 minutes it takes a signal to travel to or from the spacecraft, he said.

The wake-up call is one of the final milestones for Rosetta before it makes its rendezvous with comet 67P in the summer. The probe will then fly a series of complicated manoeuvers to observe the comet – a lump of rock and ice about four kilometres in diameter – before dropping a lander called Philae onto its icy surface in November. The lander will dig up samples and analyze them with its instruments.

Scientists hope the space mission will help them understand the composition of comets and thereby discover more about the origins and evolution of the solar system.

Source: Province

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Sebastien Clarke

Astronaut is dedicated to bringing you the latest news, reviews and information from the world of space, entertainment, sci-fi and technology. With videos, images, forums, blogs and more, get involved today & join our community!
Sebastien Clarke
Sebastien Clarke

Astronaut is dedicated to bringing you the latest news, reviews and information from the world of space, entertainment, sci-fi and technology. With videos, images, forums, blogs and more, get involved today & join our community!

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