Sci-fi Fiction to Fact #3: Star Trek “The Cage”1 min read

Star Trek has undoubtedly been a driver inspiring scientific and technological advances since it first aired in 1966. The Cage was a lost episode, originally rejected as the pilot by NBC. Footage was used to produce “The Menagerie”, a two part episode airing November 17 and November 24, 1966. Complete uncut lost episode was found in 1987 and re-mastered.

In this lost episode, the Enterprise makes its first appearance and captures a glimpse of the bridge. The first dialogue is Spock shouting “Check the Circuits”. At the time this episode was written, Gordon Moore predicted “the rate of increase of transistor density on integrated circuits and establishes a yardstick for technology progress”.


In the opening scene of this episode, Spock wave his hand in front of him to switch windows on what appears to be a flat plasma screen. The Alps electric vehicle is built integrating motion and eye sensor technologies. The company has used existing touch technologies and added motion and eye sensor cameras at the command center of the vehicle. Navigation of applications such as GPS, weather, or music can be done with a simple wave of the hand.

Furthur Reeading:

www.computerhistory.org/semiconductor/timeline/1965-Moore.html

www.engadget.com/2012/10/03/alps-electric-motion-sensors-and-eye-detection-vehicle-interface/

 

 

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Sebastien Clarke

Astronaut is dedicated to bringing you the latest news, reviews and information from the world of space, entertainment, sci-fi and technology. With videos, images, forums, blogs and more, get involved today & join our community!
Sebastien Clarke
Sebastien Clarke

Astronaut is dedicated to bringing you the latest news, reviews and information from the world of space, entertainment, sci-fi and technology. With videos, images, forums, blogs and more, get involved today & join our community!

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