BLUE ORIGIN’S ROCKET FLIES 58 MILES HIGH1 min read

New Shepard–the primary rocket from Amazon CEO Jeff Bezosprivate spaceflight venture, Blue Origin–flew a successful test flight yesterday. It climbed 307,000 feet, or 58 miles high, and did so at three times the speed of sound. The main goal for the rocket to someday take humans into space, but for now, these test flights are unmanned.
Designed to be a reusable vehicle, New Shepard can fail in new ways not expected of traditional once-and-done rockets, says Bezos. He writes at Blue Origin’s blog:
In fact, if New Shepard had been a traditional expendable vehicle, this would have been a flawless first test flight. Of course one of our goals is reusability, and unfortunately we didn’t get to recover the propulsion module because we lost pressure in our hydraulic system on descent. Fortunately, we’ve already been in work for some time on an improved hydraulic system. Also, assembly of propulsion module serial numbers 2 and 3 is already underway – we’ll be ready to fly again soon.
In the future, Blue Origin will carry passengers in a special crew pod, along with science experiments in powered lockers located inside the vessel. Blue Origin has already tested the crew’s capsule escape system, which can blast the crew-containing part of the ship a safe distance away from the rocket, in case something goes south during flight. Future tests are likely to focus on both scaling up the rocket (Bezos refers to the next iteration as the “Very Big Brother”) and on making sure the rocket lands vertically like it’s supposed to do.

SHARE THIS POST
Love
Haha
Wow
Sad
Angry

Sebastien Clarke

Astronaut is dedicated to bringing you the latest news, reviews and information from the world of space, entertainment, sci-fi and technology. With videos, images, forums, blogs and more, get involved today & join our community!
Sebastien Clarke
Sebastien Clarke

Astronaut is dedicated to bringing you the latest news, reviews and information from the world of space, entertainment, sci-fi and technology. With videos, images, forums, blogs and more, get involved today & join our community!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may also like...

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Join our mailing list to receive the latest news and updates from Astronaut.com.

You have Successfully Subscribed!